News

 

  • Noah Weeth Feinstein is collaborating with faculty and staff from the University of Illinois at Chicago and with Chicago-based artist Jenny Kendler to present and evaluate Garden for a Changing Climate, a mobile public art project and interactive event series. Comprised of a series of moveable planters of Native Midwestern species, Garden for a Changing Climate directly embodies the otherwise largely invisible, slow and dispersed threat of climate change. This project is funded by a $140k grant from the Humanities Without Walls consortium administered by the Illinois Program for Research in the Humanities. The link to the full press release is http://hosted.verticalresponse.com/364473/3ab74319c2/TEST/TEST/.

 

  • Gary Green was quoted in Wallet Hub’s post about 2017’s most and least recession-recovered cities. Read more.

 

  • A report by Malia Jones about the voting patterns in the 2016 presidential election in Wisconsin is featured in eCALS. Read more.

 

 

  • Population Trends in Post-Recession Rural America provides information about current trends confronting rural people and their communities in the United States. The briefs are available in an interactive format or can be downloaded as PDFs at http://w3001.apl.wisc.edu. The brief series is organized by the W3001: Great Recession, Its Aftermath, and Patterns of Rural and Small Town Demographic Change. The APL is a co-funder for the series. There are three briefs currently available: How the Great Recession Changed U.S. Migration Patterns, Hispanic Health Insurance Rates Differ between Established and New Hispanic Destinations, and How Migration Impacts Rural America.

 

  • Columbia University’s Center on Organizational Innovation has named Emeritus Professor Jess Gilbert visiting scholar. He retired from UW-Madison in 2015 and is now living in New York City by way of Ann Arbor, Michigan: http://www.columbia-coi.com/scholar.

 

  • Jane Collins’ new book, Three Movements to Change How We Think about the Economy, will be out in January. Read more.

 

  • Leann Tigges is collaborating with the City of Madison to conduct a study for a U.S. Department of Labor Women’s Bureau grant. Leann, Miriam Barcus, and the UW Survey Research Center will research and analyze how a paid-leave program can be developed and implemented for City employees. Read more.
  • Randy Stoecker’s new book, Liberating Service Learning and the Rest of Higher Education Civic Engagement, was written about in an article in Inside Higher Ed. Read more.

 

  • Jacquelyn Laitsch, an undergraduate major, in partnership with Lweza Village, Uganda, has been awarded a 2016-2017 Wisconsin Idea Fellowship to maximize crop output and promote sustainable agricultural resources in rural Uganda.

 

  • Annabel Ipsen won the UW’s 2016 Genevieve Gorst Herfurth award for a doctoral student in the social studies who has demonstrated outstanding research and scholarly writing accomplishments while a graduate student at UW-Madison for her paper: “Manufacturing a Natural Advantage: Capturing Technology Rents in the Genetically Modified Corn Seed Industry.”

 

  • An article by Sarah Kemp was included in an article in Education Week. Read more.

 

  • Some of Randy Stoecker’s work is featured in an article in the Wisconsin State Journal. Read more.

 

  • Annabel Ipsen, a grad student, recently had an article accepted for publication at Environmental Sociology.

 

  • Tamara Wattnem, a new graduate student in our department, just had her paper called: “Seed Laws, Certification, and Standardization: Outlawing Informal Seed Systems in the Global South” accepted for publication in the Journal of Peasant Studies. The article was based on her Master’s thesis in the Agroecology program.

 

  • Richelle Winkler, a grad of Community & Environmental Sociology, was recently tenured at Michigan Tech University.

 

  • Jess Gilbert recently published Planning Democracy: Agrarian Intellectuals and the Intended New Deal in Yale University Press’ “Agrarian Studies” Series. Read more.